University of Denver

Convenings

Lawyers providing personal legal services cover a wide spectrum and are all subject to changes beyond their control. The 20th century model of providing legal services is in question with lawyers facing both pressures and opportunities to change. This conference looked at that business model, looked at the potential for change, and set out a course to assure that legal services are vital moving forward.
In June 2015, IAALS convened a group of plaintiffs’ attorneys from Colorado and around the country to discuss the present and future impact of civil justice reform in the United States.
IAALS convened a group of senior in-house counsel and corporate management from around the country to discuss the challenges surrounding discovery in litigation. The convening provided an opportunity to discuss the current challenges and ways in which the costs of discovery can be controlled for all involved in the civil justice system.
Traditional notions of assessment in legal education have limited our capacity to truly measure whether law students are receiving the education and training they need to enter the profession. This conference demonstrated how assessment can be used for teaching, for learning, and as support for law schools and educators when developing new or innovative models.
IAALS hosted a Forum for a small group of stakeholders from around the country for the purpose of gathering comments on the proposed federal rules amendments. Following the meeting, IAALS has compiled the comments and submitted them to the Civil Rules Advisory Committee for its consideration. The comments include the various divergent views from Forum attendees, as well as areas of consensus.
Our 2nd Annual Educating Tomorrow's Lawyers Conference took a closer look at these 3 questions: What core competencies do entry level lawyers need? What structural and curricular changes ensure law grads have the necessary core competencies? How can law school accreditation and bar admissions standards facilitate innovation in legal education?
IAALS and the National Judicial College co-hosted the 2nd Annual Educational Summit for State Court Judges: Unlocking E-Discovery. The Summit provided a forum exclusively tailored for state court judges to learn about all facets of the discovery of electronically stored information—from preservation to production to eventual use at trial.
IAALS, in collaboration with the Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy Studies and the Aspen Institute Justice & Society Program, sponsored “An Uncommon Dialogue” about judicial selection.
Educating Tomorrow’s Lawyers hosted its first annual conference, The Development of Professional Identity in Legal Education: Rethinking Learning and Assessment , at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law. This was a working conference of two-three person teams from the participating ETL consortium schools. It focused on developing expertise around the formation of professional identity in legal education.
IAALS hosted its Third Civil Justice Reform Summit in September 2012. With a wealth of data from state and federal jurisdictions that are experimenting with innovative case management strategies and new rules of civil procedure, this Summit focused on the landscape of innovation and how lawyers, judges, court personnel, and academics can further advance innovative solutions.
In June 2012, IAALS hosted a two-day Summit on e-discovery, including separate sessions for practitioners and state court judges. On Friday, June 22, DISH Network L.L.C. co-sponsored a “Best in Class” eDiscovery Summit for practitioners. On Saturday, June 23rd, IAALS presented a state court judges-only eDiscovery Boot Camp, co-sponsored by the Colorado State Court Administrator’s Office.
IAALS assembled a diverse group of stakeholders, including representatives of the plaintiff and defense bars, citizens involved in judicial nominating and evaluating processes, representatives from the legislative, executive, and judicial branches, members of the business community, and non-profit leaders, to identify the desired attributes of individual judges and court systems.