Resources

David Thomson is a law professor at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law. Here, he gives an overview of his Discovery Practicum course, which is a semester-long simulation.
Designed for law teachers who want to improve their teaching and students' learning, this book offers general teaching principles and dozens of concrete ideas. The first two chapters present foundational principles of learning and instruction as well as insights from students. The next 12 chapters...
The authors of this article seek to provide thoughtful, learning-objective-based uses of technology in legal classrooms. Three factors led the authors to want to integrate technology in a useful way: 1) the trend in legal practice toward the use of more technology, 2) the technological expertise of...
In recent years, law schools have experienced increased exposure to technology with the changing student population’s familiarity with the Internet and technological advancement. Paul Caron and Rafael Gely challenge the recent backlash against allowing students to use laptops and technology in...
Cisco Systems attorney Laura Owen offers nine resolutions for law departments and firms to adapt to the changing legal atmosphere, from commoditizing routine legal transactions to measuring the success of tech innovations, that could keep departments current on the latest legal trends, technology,...
Kristen Murray advocates for integrating technology into the classroom by allowing students to use laptops in the classroom. She argues that laptops should be a welcome addition to law school classrooms because they can provide substantial educational benefits to today's law students. They might...
In her article, Camille Broussard discusses the transition in legal education that has come with advances in technology. Given that the law school population has changed with students’ knowledge and familiarity with technology and the internet, Broussard argues that the traditional format of law...
Law students matriculating today were "born digital." As digital natives, they think and process information differently than previous generations. Although law school student bodies have changed, law school assessment methods have remained static, with students nearly universally being evaluated...
Professor David Thomson authored Law School 2.0 , a book about how technology can play an important role in facilitating change in legal education. The book describes how this storm of a generational change both should and will transform the face of legal education as we know it today. It covers...
Professor Thomson authored the required textbook for his Discovery Practicum at the University of Denver. The textbook, Skills & Values: Discovery Practice , provides students excellent teaching materials for this pre-trial course. The textbook is problem-based, providing a rich learning...

Integrating Technology

Technology is ubiquitous and impacts in significant ways nearly every aspect of our 21st century lives. The current generation of law students has grown up in a world in which information has been easily accessible via the internet; they have become proficient users of digital technologies. Their learning styles and expectations have been shaped by the ways in which they have encountered technology in their educational environments. Hence, it is imperative that that we explore new ways to think about and deliver legal education. 

Straight lecturing and Socratic dialogue which have characterized the traditional law school class for decades are based on the idea that the professor is the primary source of information. This approach does not broadly engage students in the learning environment, nor does it model the world in which the students will work after graduation. Tools being integrated into legal education to address this problem include: clickers which give a presenter immediate information on student understanding, wikis for the collaborative creation of documents, blogs for short communications that invite response, research tagging tools which allow users to annotate, index, and arrange research materials, and hypertext linking which provide an array of additional links that support the primary document.