University of Denver

Blog Posts by Stephen Daniels

Areas of Innovation at the ETL Consortium Schools: The Incentive Structure

Stephen Daniels
Previously, we have drawn from the Educating Tomorrow’s Lawyers (ETL) survey to describe the 23 ETL Consortium schools, explore the kinds of curricular innovations currently in place, and look at their support for faculty engagement in the improvement of teaching and learning. This post continues those analyses by...

Areas of Innovation at Consortium Law Schools: Faculty Development Initiatives

Stephen Daniels
Previously, we have drawn from the Educating Tomorrow’s Lawyers’ survey to describe the 23 ETL Consortium schools, explore the kinds of curricular innovations in which they may be engaged, and see how they compare to law schools more generally. This post continues our description by looking at support for faculty...

Getting Beyond the Rhetoric: Findings from the ETL Survey on Curricular Initiatives

Stephen Daniels
In the wake of the recent economic downturn and its aftermath, law schools and legal education are again the focus of intense scrutiny. Unfortunately, there is often more rhetoric than constructive discussion. A key prerequisite for fostering any kind of critical and creative thinking and activity is having a...

Going Public with Innovation: Comparing Survey Respondents to All Law Schools and Non-Respondents

Stephen Daniels
This is part three of a series discussing and analyzing the results of a survey sent by Educating Tomorrow's Lawyers to 210 U.S. and Canadian law schools to explore innovations in legal education. As described in an earlier post , Educating Tomorrow's Lawyers initiated a unique, far-reaching survey of 210 U.S. and...

Going Public with Innovation: What the ETL Survey Aims to Discover

Stephen Daniels
In the first blog for Educating Tomorrow’s Lawyers, Bill Sullivan argued that legal education is more than meritocracy – that while academic merit is essential in the training of lawyers as professionals it is not enough. It is necessary, but not alone sufficient for professional excellence. This is the basic argument...