Cases Without Counsel

Courts have responded to the increasing numbers of self-represented litigants in family cases in a number of ways, and, for the most part, these efforts have been informed largely by perspectives of judges, attorneys, and court staff. All too often, litigants are left out of conversations on improving the legal process.

Our study, Cases Without Counsel: Experiences of Self-Representation in U.S. Family Court, is asking self-represented litigants in family court about their experience with the legal process. Our goal is to contribute to the conversation on how family court processes can adequately and appropriately meet the needs of all litigants. This study builds on qualitative empirical research undertaken in Canada.

Publications & Toolkit
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The findings in this Research report focus on major themes revealed through the study. In their own words, self-represented litigants and court...
Publication
This Recommendations report includes the various stakeholder recommendations alongside materials and resources for those interested in learning more...
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Stemming from the project, we have numerous recommendations for how courts, legal services providers, and communities can best serve self-represented...
More About Cases Without Counsel
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This first-of-its-kind, multi-state study asked self-represented litigants in family court about their experience with the legal process.
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If you have questions about the study, please review the frequently asked questions here.